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60 Manning Street, photo by Stephanie Ewens

Local Historic District Process

LHD Process

The process for creating a local historic district in Providence is time consuming. It takes approximately one year and involves several governmental institutions, as well as community involvement.  The basic steps are outlined below, and in the infographic:

Step 1: Residents (with support of a project sponsor) submit historic district proposal to Department of Planning & Development

Step 2: The City Plan Commission (CPC) affirms eligibility & appoints:

Step 3: A Study Committee, which consists of:

  • At Least 3 Property Owners in Proposed District
  • 1 Member of Community Group (Project Sponsor)
  • 1 Member of CPC (Chair)
  • 1 Member of the Department of Planning & Development

The study committee helps to:

  • Establish boundaries and proposed guidelines
  • Prepare documentation
  • Convene 3 public meetings to answer questions, address concerns (after CPC determination of significance, Step 4)

Step 4: The Study Committee presents findings to the City Plan Commission (CPC) in Public Meeting, and the CPC Votes to approve the significance of the study area

Step 5: The Study Committee convenes 3 public meetings to answer questions, address concerns, and collect signatures in support of the district.

Step 6: The Study Committee presents findings and signatures to the City Plan Commission (CPC) in a Public Meeting, and the CPC Votes to recommend the area to become a local historic district.

Step 7: The Department of Planning & Development drafts a Zoning Ordinance

Step 8: A City Council Representative introduces the Zoning Ordinance at a City Council Ordinance Committee

Step 9: The Ordinance Committee recommends action to City Council

Step 10: Recommendations from CPC and the City Council’s Ordinance Committee are brought before the City Council

Step 11: The recommendations from CPC and the City Council’s Ordinance Committee are brought before the City Council

Step 12: The City Council votes to approve the ordinance.

Step 13: The Mayor signs the ordinance into law

Step 14: The Historic District Commission (HDC) adopts guidelines for the new district

Step 15: The Local Historic District becomes official!

125 Governor
St. Maria's Home (1893). Architects Martin & Hall.